Jacksonville June 2012 : 18

JACKSONVILLE MAGAZINE’S TRENDS | CULTURE | PEOPLE | STYLE GPS technology has done wonders for the directionally challenged. With voice guidance systems and ever-improving wireless capabili-ties, the need to pull out a map (an actual paper one, a jumble of folds in the glove box) is practicallly nonexistent. But Jenna Sue Diermann , the 27-year-old founder of Jenna Sue Design Co., has built a business around the idea that there’s something beautiful about the lines and shapes of a city that handheld screens just can’t capture. “I was looking up Chicago on Google Maps one day, and I noticed the grid structure of the city. I thought it would be interesting to simplify it down to a basic form. The streets made a really cool graphic pattern,” says Diermann. “I started tracing the roads and ended up with a line art map. I made a handful of city maps and put them on Etsy, and people starting requesting new cities left and right.” Since designing that initial map shortly after her move to Jacksonville in September 2010, Diermann estimates that she has cre-ated maps for close to 400 cities. And yes, there’s one for Jacksonville. Map prints start at $13 at JennaSueDesign.com. ] BY NATALIE WEARSTLER • PHOTO BY AGNES LOPEZ 18 | JACKSONVILLEMAG.COM JUNE 2012

Good Life

Natalie Wearstler

GPS technology has done wonders for the directionally challenged. With voice guidance systems and ever-improving wireless capabilities, the need to pull out a map (an actual paper one, a jumble of folds in the glove box) is practicallly nonexistent. But Jenna Sue Diermann, the 27-year-old founder of Jenna Sue Design Co., has built a business around the idea that there’s something beautiful about the lines and shapes of a city that handheld screens just can’t capture.<br /> <br /> “I was looking up Chicago on Google Maps one day, and I noticed the grid structure of the city. I thought it would be interesting to simplify it down to a basic form. The streets made a really cool graphic pattern,” says Diermann. “I started tracing the roads and ended up with a line art map. I made a handful of city maps and put them on Etsy, and people starting requesting new cities left and right.” <br /> <br /> Since designing that initial map shortly after her move to Jacksonville in September 2010, Diermann estimates that she has created maps for close to 400 cities. And yes, there’s one for Jacksonville. Map prints start at $13 at JennaSueDesign.com.<br /> <br /> Blast From the Past<br /> <br /> Lecture and exhibit shed light on St. Augustine’s colonial history<br /> <br /> In honor of Sir Francis Drake's 1586 raid on Spanish St. Augustine, the St. Augustine Art Association gallery will host “Art-i-Facts: The Archaeology of Drake's Raid” on June 7 at 7 PM.City Archaeologist Carl Halbrit will discuss artifacts from the 16th century that he recently discovered, including items that Drake himself may have seen during his time in Northeast Florida. "I'm inspired to share this discovery with the community about the colonial Spanish heritage," says Halbrit. Can't make the lecture? Don't fret—some of the artifacts will be on display at the museum in the days following the presentation. More at staaa.org.<br /> <br /> BY DARIANNE STUBBS<br /> <br /> Put Up a Fight!<br /> <br /> (Or, take your seat and enjoy a free film.)<br /> <br /> Sometimes, all women want is a little respect. Follow the artistic battle for women’s equality in director Lynn Hershman Leeson’s film, !Women Art Revolution, set to screen at the Museum of Contemporary Art June 21 at 7 PM. Condensing 40 years of footage and hundreds of hours of interviews with prominent figures and artists, the film documents the layers of conflict, oppression and anger that spurred the feminist art movement in the 1970s.<br /> <br /> Viewers can expect to see commentary from the likes of masked feminist protestors from the Guerrilla Girls, artist Miriam Schapiro and writer and artist Judy Chicago. The film examines critical components in the feminist art movement, including the first feminist art education programs, political organizations and protests, alternative art spaces, publications and landmark exhibitions, performances and installations of public art.<br /> <br /> Admission is free and seating will be on a first-come-first-served basis. More at MOCAJacksonville.org.<br /> <br /> BY CAITLYN FINNEGAN<br /> <br /> Moments in Time <br /> <br /> Photographer captures glimpses of First Coast’s past<br /> <br /> Photographer captures glimpses of First Coast’s past <br /> <br /> When award-winning photographer Mary Atwood visited Dudley Farm in Newberry a year ago, she had no idea the day trip would turn into a monumental photography project. The intimate shots of rural life captured her attention and her camera lens, inspiring the new exhibit, First Coast Reflections. Atwood has since dedicated months to documenting Northeast Florida’s history, shooting spots ranging from the remains of Thomas Carnegie’s 59-room Southern mansion to St. Augustine’s oldest school house, all in an attempt to share the beauty in history’s hardships and to raise awareness about preservation efforts.<br /> <br /> This month, visitors to the Springfield Karpeles Manuscript Museum can linger over Atwood’s 28 black-and-white shots of Spanish forts, colonial homes and plantations, all captured within a 150- mile radius of Jacksonville. The museum is open 10 AM to 3 PM Tuesday through Friday, and from 10 AM to 4 PM on Saturday. Admission is free.More at Rain.org/~Karpeles. <br /> <br /> BY CAITLYN FINNEGAN<br /> <br /> BEAUTY BREAK<br /> <br /> BY NIKKI KIMBLETON<br /> <br /> Nikki Kimbleton, a host on WJXTTV4’ s The Morning Show, shares the products and services that help her stay camera-ready, even when she’s off the clock.<br /> <br /> • When I was a teenager, if I was sun bathing within my mom’s eyesight, she would always yell to me, "Cover your face!" I’m so glad I listened. These days, I don’t need Mom to remind me.Instead, I use a lightly-tinted, heavy-duty sunscreen. EltaMD UV Physical SPF 41 has UVA/UVB protection and works really well under makeup. If you’ve ever used a high-level sunscreen, you know it doesn’t usually mesh well with other cosmetic products. The great thing about this one, though, is that you can use it alone or with your current makeup routine.<br /> <br /> • The hot, humid weather, combined with layers of sunscreen and sweat on your face, can really damage your skin and leave you looking tired and dull. This is a great time to invest in Microdermabrasion. Lots of spas and health centers offer the cosmeceutical treatment but the Spa at One Ocean Resort is my personal favorite. If you’ve never had Microdermabrasion before, it gently removes only the very top layers of damaged skin with tiny crystals (think of it as the equivalent of a light “sand blasting”). The treatment at One Ocean adds a hydrating mask, creamy moisturizer and sun block, and costs $145 for 50 minutes. For even better results, add the Oxygen Facial. If you’re on a budget, Sephora has several at-home options for under $100.<br /> <br /> • It may be hard to tell on TV, but like a lot of women, I have brown spots on my face. Actually, they're a result of Melasma and believe me, I've tried everything to fight it. They faded with laser and chemical peels, but the discoloration always came back. While tons of products claim to make the spots fade, they usually don't deliver. Finally, Dr. Jason Meier suggested I try Obagi Nu-Derm, a multi-step skin system that delivers results in just a few weeks without surgery. There is one downside: your skin will peel when you first start using the product, but it doesn't last long. I often switch back and forth between Osmotics and Obagi, and everytime I use the latter, my mom calls to tell me how good my skin looks on TV. You can find the Obagi system at Meier Plastic Surgery; a three- to fourmonth supply will cost around $500.<br /> <br /> Water, Water, Everywhere<br /> <br /> Three Jacksonville residents who have made their mark on the water sports world<br /> <br /> Kurtis Loftis <br /> <br /> Claim to Fame: Guinness World Record Holder, Longest Surfing Marathon <br /> <br /> For most people, the word “marathon” conjures images of runners sprinting along roadways for a few hours. Last year, Kurtis Loftis of Jacksonville Beach created his own marathon in the Atlantic Ocean with the goal of surfing his way into the Guinness Book of World Records.<br /> <br /> The mark to beat was 26 hours and 1 minute, previously set by William Laity in Huntington Beach, California. Loftis paddled out at 1 PM on October 26, 2011, with a goal to surf for 30 hours while simultaneously raising awareness and money for breast cancer research.<br /> <br /> “I knew getting through the night would be one of the greatest battles. It would be partly a physical battle but more a mental battle. Twelve hours in the dark on a surfboard would require friends to help in ways I never imagined,” says the graphic designer and agency owner.<br /> <br /> By Thursday night, Loftis could see supporters gathering on the beach, waiting to celebrate as he set the official new record: 29 hours, one minute, according to Guinness. “I caught a wave in the dark and heard the beach erupt. I stood up on wave 308 and rode to the beach. The record was set. Party Wave!” More at MarathonSurfer.com <br /> <br /> Kristi Overton-Johnson Claim to Fame: World champion water skier <br /> Keystone Heights is North Central Florida’s land of lakes. Home to Blue Pond and lakes Magnolia, Geneva, Lowry and Brooklyn, it’s also where you’ll find world-class skier named Kristi Overton-Johnson.<br /> <br /> Born in Greenville, South Carolina, Overton-Johnson now calls the Clay County town home. She started skiing at age four, turned pro at 13 and dominated her sport from the mid- 1980s onward. From 1992-2010, she notched over 80 professional wins and captured more number-one rankings than any other female skier in history for the slalom (one-ski) category.<br /> <br /> “There were a lot of falls between 1974 and being a world champion,” she says. “The water’s not very soft.There are a lot of life lessons. It has been an amazing journey.” <br /> <br /> After her professional skiing days ended, she picked up the rope of another challenge—to breathe a champion’s spirit into youth through watersports.Her organization, an outreach ministry, called Champion’s Heart, was created to encourage young people to believe in themselves and their dreams.<br /> <br /> “We teach kids that champions aren’t people who never fall, but people who get up and say ‘Hit it,’” she says, referring to a phrase skiers yell to their boat captains. “Victory only comes when you get off the dock.” More at ChampionsHeart.org. <br /> <br /> Jim Alabiso <br /> <br /> Claim to Fame: Aquatic Marathon Swimmer <br /> <br /> Jim Alabiso, a Brooklyn native, didn’t start his athletic career as a swimmer.But following a cycling accident in 2004 that left him with a broken hip, he had to find a new sport. After a hip replacement and a long rehab, he found therapy and fulfillment in the water. Now in his 50s and a member of the Duval Ocean Swimmers, Alabiso has stroked and kicked in races across Lake Tahoe, San Francisco Bay and Key Biscayne, placing high in his division.<br /> <br /> He completed a 3.5-mile swim across the St. Johns last July; and on June 9, Alabiso will attempt the 12-Mile Swim for the St. Johns, a swimmer’s marathon. His chief goal is to raise awareness and preservation for the river. The marathon will start at the county dock by the Mandarin Museum at 6:30 AM, and Alabiso hopes to swim ashore close to noon at the Riverside Arts Market under the Fuller Warren Bridge.<br /> <br /> “We looked at the tide patterns for this time of year and picked what we hope will be the perfect day to complete the swim,” says Alabiso. “I love doing this and any time I can bring attention to how great the St. Johns is and what we can do to preserve it, I will.” <br /> <br /> More at upstjohns.org<br /> <br /> 30-SECOND CRITIC<br /> <br /> BY NATALIE WEARSTLER & JOHN O’MARA<br /> <br /> NON-FICTION <br /> <br /> Growing Up Jacksonville (The History Press, $19.99) <br /> <br /> Ever dine at or even hear of The Embers Restaurant? If so, you may call yourself a Jax old-timer. Or, perhaps you just finished reading the 124-page paperback Growing Up Jacksonville, A ‘50s & ‘60s River City Childhood by Dorothy K. Fletcher. The book is a pleasant read full of firsthand accounts of locals rolling around Skateland, visiting the elephant Miss Debbie at the zoo, and taking trains in and out of what is now the Prime Osborn Convention Center. Fletcher’s recollections are a bit wistful, maybe even a touch self-indulgent, but the overall picture they paint is generally fun and informative.<br /> <br /> NON-FICTION <br /> <br /> Valerie Wilson’s World (Valerie Wilson Publications, $50) <br /> <br /> There’s a big, luxurious planet out there. And travel agency founder and part-time Ponte Vedran Valerie Wilson has a huge new hardback coffee table book to prove it. Valerie Wilson’s World, The Top Hotels & Resorts spans some 400 pages in which the author highlights hundreds of posh lodgings from the Czech Republic to Puerto Rico and everywhere in between.<br /> <br /> Northeast Florida makes one appearance with a page devoted to The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island. The photos are great, and each sandy beach, indulgent spa, glamorous restaurant and chic suite can’t help but make one think: Why would you ever want to go home?<br /> <br /> FICTION <br /> <br /> The Unwilling Spy (World Jewels Publishing, $12.99) <br /> <br /> Ron Chamblin is a name that many book lovers in Jacksonville know well; his sister, however, is seeking to make her own mark in the fiction world. Sue Chamblin Frederick’s novel, The Unwilling Spy is set in Spain at the height of World War II.The story follows the plight of Garcia Quinones, a revered pianist who tries to live a quiet life.However, when a woman from his past seeks him out for a private performance with her new lover, a high-ranking Nazi official, Quinones finds himself entangled in a web of danger, intrigue and national patriotism with only one way out: spyhood. <br /> <br /> The Royal Treatment<br /> <br /> It’s almost impossible not to feel a bit like royalty while staying at The King and Prince on St. Simons Island. The resort was built in 1935 as a private dance club, only to become the King and Prince Hotel in 1941. Southern eats and hospitality are plentiful on St. Simons.Residents favor "island time," and you’ll quickly find yourself slowing down, too.<br /> <br /> Jeff Kaplan, executive chef at The King and Prince, has succeeded in creating an exceptional Southern cuisine experience for guests.Nearby, other notable restaurants and entrepreneurs embrace the same epicurean focus.While in Georgia, seek out wares from 13th Colony Distillery, Sweet Grass Dairy and Still Pond Winery to taste the region’s offerings for happy hour essentials.<br /> <br /> After watching the sunrise over the ocean, make your way to the King and Prince’s restaurant for breakfast. Chef Kaplan’s take on traditional eggs benedict is a delightful meal with poached eggs resting on fried green tomatoes and bacon with goat cheese on top of English muffins. If an evening cocktail is what you’re after, the King and Prince’s food and beverage director, Vinny D’Agostino, makes a homemade limoncello that is smooth and sublime.<br /> <br /> For a hands-on foodie experience, take the Lady Jane Tour, a shrimp cruise that allows guests to touch, hold and photograph the day’s catch before enjoying a boiled batch of the trademark white shrimp while on board. Later in the day, secure a bench at the ultra-casual Southern Soul Barbecue, a local stop that was featured on the Food Network’s Diners, Drive-ins and Dives. Diners with an artistic flair will enjoy the locally sourced menu at Palmer’s Village Café, as well as the local art work for sale on the walls.<br /> <br /> While on the Georgia barrier island, save one meal to enjoy the award-winning Halyards Restaurant, where chef Dave Snyder’s menu features grilled whole shrimp with salsa, sautéed flounder with caramelized Vidalia crab scampi butter, and oysters grilled with garlic oil and chimicurri.<br /> <br /> In between all the delicious stops on St. Simons, there are plenty of ways to unwind. A round or two on the King and Prince golf course is a leisurely luxury; the course is famous for a group of four spectacular signature holes, all situated in the marsh. Or, catch a historic trolley tour of the area with Cap Fendig, whose family has resided on the island since the 1800s. Better yet, take some time to stroll around and talk with the locals. You’ll find yourself on island time in no time at all.<br /> <br /> BY DIANE LEONE<br /> <br /> SplashZone<br /> <br /> How do you improve an entertainment area that includes a three-story-high slide into the Gulf? For TradeWinds Island Grand Resort in St. Pete Beach, the answer is to add even more activities. The resort built the state’s first floating water park last spring, the 15,750-square-foot Splash Island Water Park (below) and is now rolling out more options for family fun. Strap into the JetLev (right), a water-propelled jetpack that soars up to heights of 30 feet at 30 miles an hour. There’s also surfing lessons with WaveJets, the resort’s new electric surfboards. For the less adventurous, equally fun options are the spinning Gyrosphere and the bungee trampoline. Admission to the park is $16 an hour for resort guests, $25 an hour for visitors; prices vary for other activities. More at JustLetGo.com. <br /> <br /> BY CAITLYN FINNEGAN<br /> <br /> Summer Fun <br /> <br /> Florida’s Gulf Coast resorts are eager to assure visitors that the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is a distant memory. Package deals are plentiful, so shop around. For example, the Hilton Sandestin Beach has a "Summer to Remember" deal featuring beach-view accommodations, daily breakfast for two, a reserved beach set-up (one umbrella and two chairs), and a disposable camera to capture it all on film. Rates start at $319 per night, based on a three-night minimum stay, and the offer is valid June 1 through September 3. More at SandestinBeachHilton.com.<br /> <br /> BY JOHN O’MARA

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