Jacksonville January 2016 : Page 58

HEALTH [] LEAN ON ME l When children are diagnosed with cancer, it alters the family forever. However, support groups make the journey a lit-tle easier. Momcology is an online support group of par-ents and caregivers of those children. It was formed to help deal with the loneliness any parent feels once her child is diagnosed. Since its inception in October 2012, Momcology has connected thousands of cancer mothers by pediatric cancer diagnosis, regionally for local support and by cross diagnosis specialty groups. momcology.org u MANDY NIESEN Shakin’ Off the Bacon The skinny on how diet and weight are linked to cancer risk BY STELLA KATSIPOUTIS Cold Blooded Some professional athletes have integrated cryotherapy— a practice by which the body is exposed to subzero temper-atures to stimulate a central nervous system response— into their post-recovery rou-tines for years. Now, average Jacksonville Joes can take a turn in the chamber. OUT-LAST Cryo-therapy and Performance Training is the first local facility to feature a cryochamber. Patients stand in a cylindri-cal chamber for approximately two-and-a-half minutes, dur-ing which time hyper-cold air is released around the body (250-275 degrees below zero). Reportedly, the body responds by rushing blood to the core to protect its vital organs— something proponents say has health benefits. u ERICA SANTILLO WITH OUTRAGEOUS RECIPES like Maple Caramel Bacon Crack taking over social media, one thing is pretty obvious: We’re a nation that loves bacon. But amid all the irresistibly bizarre recipes, Facebook and Twitter users have also been bombarded with the recent news that the overconsumption of red and processed meats is strongly linked to an increased risk of cancer. On October 26, the World Health Organization released a report that provided substantial evi-dence linking red/processed meats to colorectal cancer. The finding was based on information gathered by the American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) and a panel of 22 international experts, who reviewed more than 800 studies and decades of research on this topic from all over the world. “Processed meats have been suspected of increasing the risk of cancer for a while, but it was not clear how strong the risk was,” says Cynthia Anderson, radiation oncologist at Baptist MD Anderson Cancer Center in Jacksonville. “When the World Health Organization got their results, they were sur-prised at how strong the connection was. They gave avoiding processed meats a Level I recom-mendation—the highest level of recommenda-tion they can give.” The report affirmed that red meat contains an iron compound that can damage the lining of the colon, as well as another compound that pro-motes the formation of potential carcinogens. Cooking red meat at high temperatures may also produce heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), both of which are chemicals that cause changes in DNA and can potentially lead to cancer. Processed meats are also packed with cancer-causing preservatives like nitrites and nitrates. “They found that 3.5 ounces of red meat every day (that’s 24.5 ounces per week) increases risk of colorectal cancer by 17 percent,” says Karen Ambrosio, oncology wellness specialist at Ackerman Cancer Center in Jacksonville. “In addition, eating only 1.8 ounces of processed meat every day increased the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent. That’s the equivalent of four strips of bacon or one hot dog.” Maintaining a healthy weight is also crucial in the effort to elude cancer. Based on evidence pro-vided by the 2015 Continuous Update Project (CUP)—the world’s largest resource of scientific literature on food, nutrition, physical activity and cancer published by the AICR and the World Cancer Research Fund International—the num-ber of obesity-related cancers has been bumped up to 10. Obesity has been linked to prostate, ovarian, endometrial, liver, esophageal, kidney and pancreatic cancers. So exactly how does someone’s weight nega-58 | JACKSONVILLEMAG.COM / JANUARY 2016

Health

Stella Katsipoutis

Shakin’ Off the Bacon

The skinny on how diet and weight are linked to cancer risk

WITH OUTRAGEOUS RECIPES like Maple Caramel Bacon Crack taking over social media, one thing is pretty obvious: We’re a nation that loves bacon. But amid all the irresistibly bizarre recipes, Facebook and Twitter users have also been bombarded with the recent news that the overconsumption of red and processed meats is strongly linked to an increased risk of cancer.

On October 26, the World Health Organization released a report that provided substantial evidence linking red/processed meats to colorectal cancer. The finding was based on information gathered by the American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) and a panel of 22 international experts, who reviewed more than 800 studies and decades of research on this topic from all over the world.

“Processed meats have been suspected of increasing the risk of cancer for a while, but it was not clear how strong the risk was,” says Cynthia Anderson, radiation oncologist at Baptist MD Anderson Cancer Center in Jacksonville. “When the World Health Organization got their results, they were surprised at how strong the connection was. They gave avoiding processed meats a Level I recommendation— the highest level of recommendation they can give.”

The report affirmed that red meat contains an iron compound that can damage the lining of the colon, as well as another compound that promotes the formation of potential carcinogens. Cooking red meat at high temperatures may also produce heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), both of which are chemicals that cause changes in DNA and can potentially lead to cancer. Processed meats are also packed with cancer-causing preservatives like nitrites and nitrates.

“They found that 3.5 ounces of red meat every day (that’s 24.5 ounces per week) increases risk of colorectal cancer by 17 percent,” says Karen Ambrosio, oncology wellness specialist at Ackerman Cancer Center in Jacksonville. “In addition, eating only 1.8 ounces of processed meat every day increased the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent. That’s the equivalent of four strips of bacon or one hot dog.”

Maintaining a healthy weight is also crucial in the effort to elude cancer. Based on evidence provided by the 2015 Continuous Update Project (CUP)—the world’s largest resource of scientific literature on food, nutrition, physical activity and cancer published by the AICR and the World Cancer Research Fund International—the number of obesity-related cancers has been bumped up to 10. Obesity has been linked to prostate, ovarian, endometrial, liver, esophageal, kidney and pancreatic cancers.

So exactly how does someone’s weight negatively affect their risk of cancer? The National Cancer Institute states that the issue is multifaceted. Fat tissue produces excess amounts of various hormones, like estrogen, insulin and adipokines, and this imbalance helps promote cell proliferation and tumor growth in certain parts of the body. Obesity also causes low-level inflammation and higher stress levels in the body, which has also been associated with a higher cancer risk.

Unfortunately, obesity rates have more than doubled over the past 35 years, says Amrosio. But even though the number of obesity-related cancer cases is expected to grow, that’s not to say we can’t do anything about it.

“A projection of the future health and economic burden of obesity in 2030 estimated that continuation of existing trends in obesity will lead to about500,000 additional cases of cancer in the United States by 2030,” says Lori Solem, a clinical dietitian and nutrition instructor at Jacksonville’s Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “This analysis also found that if every adult reduced their BMI by 1 percent, which would be equivalent to a weight loss of roughly 2 pounds for an adult of average weight, this would result in the avoidance of about 100,000 new cases of cancer.”

Our best opportunity to prevent illnesses like cancer is to make the right choices in our diet and take care of our bodies. “No matter what we develop in medicine, nothing trumps the basics when it comes to preventing cancer or a recurrence,” says Anderson. “The best advice remains to eat six servings of a diverse range of fruits and vegetables a day. It exposes our bodies to the widest range of nutrients.”

As stated by the AICR, key foods that can help nip cancer in the bud include apples, blueberries, broccoli, cruciferous vegetables (i.e., cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, etc.), cherries, coffee, whole grains and grapefruits.

And as tempting as those crazy Pinterest recipes are, stay away from the bad stuff. “Try to avoid added sugar and sweetened beverages. Limit your consumption of alcohol, salt and energydense foods such as processed food, which is high in calories but low in nutrients,” says Ambrosio.

Engaging in at least 30 to 40 minutes of vigorous physical activity three to four times a week is also a must in safeguarding against cancer. Even if it’s just a brisk walk, says Ambrosio, any exercise that makes you sweat will help you lower your risk of colon, breast, uterine and lung cancers.

“You might need to make sacrifices, but you are going to feel the satisfaction of doing the best you can in order to stay healthy,” says Ambrosio.

LEAN ON ME

When children are diagnosed with cancer, it alters the family forever. However, support groups make the journey a little easier. Momcology is an online support group of parents and caregivers of those children. It was formed to help deal with the loneliness any parent feels once her child is diagnosed. Since its inception in October 2012, Momcology has connected thousands of cancer mothers by pediatric cancer diagnosis, regionally for local support and by cross diagnosis specialty groups. Momcology.org MANDY NIESEN

Cold Blooded

Some professional athletes have integrated cryotherapy— a practice by which the body is exposed to subzero temperatures to stimulate a central nervous system response— into their post-recovery routines for years. Now, average Jacksonville Joes can take a turn in the chamber. OUTLAST Cryo-therapy and Performance Training is the first local facility to feature a cryochamber.

Patients stand in a cylindrical chamber for approximately two-and-a-half minutes, during which time hyper-cold air is released around the body (250-275 degrees below zero). Reportedly, the body responds by rushing blood to the core to protect its vital organs— something proponents say has health benefits. ERICA SANTILL

Read the full article at http://trendmag2.trendoffset.com/article/Health/2356810/286016/article.html.

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