Space Coast Medicine September/October 2010 : Page 45

Dr. Steve Griffith D Medical missions in the world’s most desperate places defines Griffith’s life r. Steve Griffi th chose one of the most troubled regions of the world to off er his skills to those in need. Griffith volunteered in Afghanistan, helping train young physicians learning family practice skills. Th e goal of the program is to encourage doctors to stay in Afghanistan, rather than seek train-ing overseas. Griffith spent three weeks teach-ing advanced cardiac life support through CURE International. Th e non-profi t Christian organiza-tion takes medical help to developing countries. While working in the CURE Hospital’s emer-gency room, he met a young girl he knew only as Fatima. Her father had DR. STEVE GRIFFITH been killed in the confl ict and her mother was ill, so she would beg for food to feed her younger brothers. Dr. LanceMaki Maki grows NKF Pro Am Surf Festival, the largest charity surf event in the world D r. LanceMaki is combining a sport he loves with a cause he believes in. Th e physician began tandem surfi ng three years ago. At 62, he has won Grand Masters tournaments sponsored by the International Tandem Surfi ng Association with his surf partner, Jaci Remrey. “It’s a beautiful sport,” Maki said. In 2008, Maki began talk-DR. LANCE MAKI ing to local surf festival or-ganizers Rich Salick and Bill Hahn about adding Cocoa Beach to the Tandem tour. All that was missing was a purse to attract professional surfers to compete in the NKF Pro AmSurf Festival, the largest charity surf event in the world. Over its 25-year history, the Cocoa Beach surf festival has raised millions of dollars for the National Kid-ney Foundation of Florida. A MOST GIVING DOC: Dr. Lance Maki presents Rich Salick with the Mike Spence Aloha Spirit Award at the NKF Surf Fest. He solved the money problem by donating his 1954 Chevy truck to be raffl ed for the cause. Tandemsurf-ing came to Cocoa Beach, and has grown at the festival ever since. Th is year, a dozen tandem teams competed, from France, California, Virginia Beach, Hawaii, and of course, hometown favorites Lance and Jaci. Maki has attracted corporate donors to the surf festival, raising moremoney for the National Kidney Foundation. In addition, “we brought a really nice show that wouldn’t have gotten here otherwise,” he said. In addition to increasing fundraising next year, Maki wants to add a participatory feature to the surf festival. Tandem surfers will make their boards and themselves available to take people out for a ride who can’t surf by themselves. ■ IN AFGHANISTAN: Dr. Griffi th instructed the local residents on medical procedures using what limited resources were available. Here he draws off several syringes of fl uid from this man’s knee for fluid analysis. “Given that we were working in the world’s leading opium producing country, it was ironic that the clinic only had tylenol for pain killers,” said Dr. Griffith. “Despite it all, she can still manage a smile,” Griffith said. “Th is is the face of hope in Afghanistan.” Griffi th served in the Peace Corps before attend-ing medical school and now works as an emergency room physician. Before taking themed school path, he had considered attending seminary until a min-ister counseled him to pursue his unique talents and let God work through himusing his gift s. Griffi th’s wife, Kellie, a psychiatrist and a Major in the U.S. Air Force, was sent to Afghanistan in 2007 to help troops deal with combat stress. Th e couple has two children. ■

Dr. Steve Griffith

<B>Medical missions in the world’s most desperate places defines Griffith’s life</B><br /> <br /> Dr. Steve Griffi th chose one of the most troubled regions of the world to off er his skills to those in need. Griffi th volunteered in Afghanistan, helping train young physicians learning family practice skills.<br /> <br /> Th e goal of the program is to encourage doctors to stay in Afghanistan, rather than seek training overseas. Griffi th spent three weeks teaching advanced cardiac life support through CURE International. Th e nonprofi t Christian organization takes medical help to developing countries.<br /> <br /> While working in the CURE Hospital’s emergency room, he met a young girl he knew only as Fatima. Her father had been killed in the confl ict and her mother was ill, so she would beg for food to feed her younger brothers.<br /> <br /> “Despite it all, she can still manage a smile,” Griffi th said. “Th is is the face of hope in Afghanistan.”<br /> <br /> Griffith served in the Peace Corps before attending medical school and now works as an emergency room physician. Before taking the med school path, he had considered attending seminary until a minister counseled him to pursue his unique talents and let God work through him using his gift s. <br /> <br /> Griffith’s wife, Kellie, a psychiatrist and a Major in the U.S. Air Force, was sent to Afghanistan in 2007 to help troops deal with combat stress. Th e couple has two children.<br /> <br />

Dr. Lance Maki

<B>Maki grows NKF Pro Am Surf Festival, the largest charity surf event in the world</B><br /> <br /> Dr. Lance Maki is combining a sport he loves with a cause he believes in. Th e physician began tandem surfi ng three years ago. At 62, he has won Grand Masters tournaments sponsored by the International Tandem Surfi ng Association with his surf partner, Jaci Remrey. “It’s a beautiful sport,” Maki said.<br /> <br /> In 2008, Maki began talking to local surf festival organizers Rich Salick and Bill Hahn about adding Cocoa Beach to the Tandem tour. All that was missing was a purse to attract professional surfers to compete in the NKF Pro Am Surf Festival, the largest charity surf event in the world. Over its 25-year history, the Cocoa Beach surf festival has raised millions of dollars for the National Kidney Foundation of Florida.<br /> <br /> He solved the money problem by donating his 1954 Chevy truck to be raffl ed for the cause. Tandem surfing came to Cocoa Beach, and has grown at the festival ever since. Th is year, a dozen tandem teams competed, from France, California, Virginia Beach, Hawaii, and of course, hometown favorites Lance and Jaci.<br /> <br /> Maki has attracted corporate donors to the surf festival, raising more money for the National Kidney Foundation. In addition, “we brought a really nice show that wouldn’t have gotten here otherwise,” he said.<br /> <br /> In addition to increasing fundraising next year, Maki wants to add a participatory feature to the surf festival. Tandem surfers will make their boards and themselves available to take people out for a ride who can’t surf by themselves.

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