Jet November 15, 2010 : Page 14

Maya Angelou Donates Private Collection To Schomburg Center In Harlem D By ClarenCe Waldron NATION r. Maya Angelou loves li-braries. She respects them for the knowledge, power and history they provide. Angelou, 82, recently do-nated her personal papers and career memorabilia to The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, a division of the New York Public Library. “I have always wanted my papers to be at The Schomburg,” she says. “I have always supported libraries in general because I think to be forewarned is to be forearmed. You can be forewarned by history. You need to know where you are going, where you have been if you want to know where you are going and if you want to get anywhere. The history is there and available.” The Maya Angelou Collection spans some 40 years and chronicles her rise to fame as an inspiring, eloquent poet and compassionate public intellectual. She praises the historic and unique role of The Schomburg. “It’s a magnificent depository of all the information about the African-American experience. I am grateful that it exists so that all the children, Black and White, Asian, Spanish-speaking, Native Americans and Aleutian can know there is a place where they can go and find the truth of the people’s history.” 14 The expansive collection includes 340 boxes of material from her iconic career, including handwritten notes on long, yellow legal pads for her groundbreaking autobi-ography I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings and famous poems, Phenomenal Woman and Still I Rise ; a rough draft of On The Pulse Of Morning ; rare family photos; fan mail; and personal letters from Malcolm X, Coretta Scott King and James Baldwin and others. The collection will be available to the public in about 18 months. “We are pleased and honored to have the Dr. Maya Angelou Collection,” Howard Dodson, director of The Schomburg, told JET. “She is one of the most recognized and revered African-Americans of the 20th century. The impact that she has as a writer, a public intellectual and voice of consciousness for the nation is unrivaled by any writer. This is her unique gift that she gives to the world.”// NELL REDMoND/AP

Nation

Clarence Waldron

<b>Maya Angelou Donates Private Collection To Schomburg Center In Harlem</b><br /> <br /> Dr. Maya Angelou loves libraries.She respects them for the knowledge, power and history they provide.<br /> <br /> Angelou, 82, recently donated her personal papers and career memorabilia to The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, a division of the New York Public Library.<br /> <br /> “I have always wanted my papers to be at The Schomburg,” she says. “I have always supported libraries in general because I think to be forewarned is to be forearmed. You can be forewarned by history. You need to know where you are going, where you have been if you want to know where you are going and if you want to get anywhere. The history is there and available.”<br /> <br /> The Maya Angelou Collection spans some 40 years and chronicles her rise to fame as an inspiring, eloquent poet and compassionate public intellectual.<br /> <br /> She praises the historic and unique role of The Schomburg. “It’s a magnificent depository of all the information about the African-American experience. I am grateful that it exists so that all the children, Black and White, Asian, Spanish-speaking, Native Americans and Aleutian can know there is a place where they can go and find the truth of the people’s history.”<br /> <br /> The expansive collection includes 340 boxes of material from her iconic career, including handwritten notes on long, yellow legal pads for her groundbreaking autobiography I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings and famous poems, Phenomenal Woman and Still I Rise; a rough draft of On The Pulse Of Morning; rare family photos; fan mail; and personal letters from Malcolm X, Coretta Scott King and James Baldwin and others. The collection will be available to the public in about 18 months.<br /> <br /> “We are pleased and honored to have the Dr. Maya Angelou Collection,” Howard Dodson, director of The Schomburg, told JET. “She is one of the most recognized and revered African-Americans of the 20th century. The impact that she has as a writer, a public intellectual and voice of consciousness for the nation is unrivaled by any writer. This is her unique gift that she gives to the world.”//<br /> <br /> <b>Sextuplets Become Famous</b><br /> <br /> It’s been five months and proud parents Mia and Rozonno McGhee are finally settling in to being first-time parents to six newborn babies.<br /> <br /> Born June 9 in Columbus, Ohio, their four boys and two girls — Isaac, Josiah, Elijah, Rozonno Jr., Madison and Olivia — have become little stars after recently being featured on their own Facebook page.<br /> <br /> “We’ve been receiving a lot of phone calls from producers who want to do a reality show … I’d rather do a book or let my kids model, something like that,” says Mia McGhee, who celebrates her 30th birthday Nov. 19 and the couple’s 11th wedding anniversary Nov. 18. “But it is very overwhelming. Talk shows contacted us … big-name corporations are trying to contact us wanting to help … with products.”<br /> <br /> McGhee explains that this was her second pregnancy. She previously miscarried twin boys,And on Dec. 8 of last year, she conceived seven babies — they lost baby Naomi at 23 weeks.<br /> <br /> “It was horrible … we were concerned about the other (babies),” she says.<br /> <br /> But all six infants are happy and healthy.<br /> <br /> “The girls are feisty, they want what they want and they’re not going to stop until they get it,” she says of Madison and Olivia.<br /> <br /> “Josiah, he’s always been the smallest one. He was born at 1.5 pounds and is 9 pounds now. He’s a little fireball. Elijah has a bit of a temper. Rozonno Jr. Is laid back and Isaac is a little jealous and nosy; he looks at everything.”<br /> <br /> The couple receives daily help with feeding, bathing and changing from their church family and friends. The sextuplets sleep two to a crib.<br /> <br /> With the children being born at Ohio State University, Mia says she hopes they receive scholarships to the same school. “These are my Buckeye babies,” she laughs.//<br /> <br /> <b>MARSHA AMBROSIUS, LEDISI, JILL SCOTT AND KELLY PRICE</b><br /> <br /> Perform onstage below an image of iconic singer Nina Simone during Black Girls Rock! At the Paradise Theater in The Bronx borough of New York City. The annual show celebrates exceptional women of color who inspire others and who have made outstanding contributions in their careers. Black Girls Rock! Is a nonprofi t youth empowerment and mentoring organization that promotes arts for girls.<br /> <br /> <b>Visionary</b><br /> <br /> MISSY ELLIOTT: Innovative songwriter/rapper is a savvy businesswoman in a maledominated industry.<br /> <br /> <b>Who Got Next?</b><br /> <br /> KEKE PALMER: Young star of the fi lm Akeelah And The Bee, now at 17, is also a TV actress and a budding singer.<br /> <br /> <b>Young, Gifted & Black</b><br /> <br /> RAVEN-SYMONÉ: Multitalented performer (since her Cosby Show days) has been a success since she was 4.<br /> <br /> <b>Living Legend</b><br /> <br /> RUBY DEE: Prolifi c actress, writer and producer — from theater to fi lm — shows no signs of slowing down.<br /> <br /> <b>Shot Caller</b><br /> <br /> TERESA CLARK: Chairman and CEO of africa.com wants to change the way the world sees Africa.<br /> <br /> <b>Motivator</b><br /> <br /> IYANLA VANZANT: Her inspirational teachings on self-empowerment and spirituality motivate others to fulfi ll their purpose.<br /> <br /> <b>Trailblazer</b><br /> <br /> MAJ. GEN. MARCELITE<br /> <br /> J. HARRIS: A proven leader who was named by President Obama to the Board of Visitors (Trustees) for the U.S. Air Force Academy.<br /> <br /> <b>Bishop Arthur M. Brazier: Activist, Pastor Of Chicago Church</b><br /> <br /> Bishop Arthur M. Brazier will be remembered for his “gentle heart” and the profound impact he had on his church and the Chicago community.<br /> <br /> Brazier, the pastor emeritus of the Apostolic Church of God in Chicago, died after a five-year battle with prostate cancer at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. He was 89.<br /> <br /> He became pastor of Apostolic Church of God in 1960 and served as its leader until his retirement in June 2008. His son, Dr. Byron T. Brazier, succeeded him as pastor.<br /> <br /> A native of Chicago, Bishop Brazier took the church of about 100 members and turned it into one of Chicago’s largest Churches, with a membership of more than 20,000. A committed civil rights activist, he invited Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. To the church in 1966 and they later protested together against segregated housing and schools in Chicago.<br /> <br /> Barack Obama visited the church during his presidential campaign on Father’s Day 2008 and emphasized the significance of family and the need for men to become responsible, reliable dads to their children.<br /> <br /> Upon hearing of his death, President Obama described him as a “dear friend, a stalwart of the city of Chicago and one of our nation’s leading moral lights.” Obama added, “There is no way that we can replace the gentle heart and boundless determination that Bishop Brazier brought to some of the most pressing challenges facing Chicago and our nation. However, his spirit will live on through the parishioners, leaders and friends that he touched each day.”<br /> <br /> He is survived by his wife, Esther Isabelle Brazier; children, Lola Hillman, Dr. Byron T. Brazier, Janice Dortch and Rosalyn Shepherd; seven grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.//<br /> <br /> <b>Gregory Isaacs:</b><br /> <br /> <b>Jamaican Reggae Singer</b><br /> <br /> Gregory Isaacs, 59, the Jamaican reggae sing er whose smooth style earned him the nickname “Cool Ruler,” died recently at his London home, said Isaacs’ manager, Cope land Forbes. Isaacs had been diagnosed with lung cancer a year ago but contin ued performing until weeks before his death.<br /> <br /> His wife, Linda, said Isaacs was “wellloved by every one, his fans and his family, and he worked really hard to make sure he delivered the music they loved and enjoyed.”<br /> <br /> Born in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1951, Isaacs began recording in his teens, and went on to produce scores of albums.<br /> <br /> With his sinuous baritone and romantic songs, Isaacs became a leading proponent of the mellow “Lovers Rock” style of reggae. He hit his stride in the mid-1970s with ballads like Love Is Overdue and All I Have Is Love.<br /> <br /> Later that decade he team ed up with the Jamaican production duo of Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare for several hit songs, including Soon Forward and What A Feeling.<br /> <br /> Isaacs was best known internationally for the title song from his 1982 album Night Nurse, a club favorite that later became a hit for Simply Red.<br /> <br /> His career was stalled by a cocaine habit that landed him in jail on several occasions. Isaacs said ruefully in 2007 that he’d gone to “Cocaine High School ... the greatest college ever, but the most expensive school fee ever paid.”<br /> <br /> Drug abuse took a toll on his voice but he kept making music, releasing a well-received fi nal album, Brand New Me, in 2008.<br /> <br /> <b>PASSINGS... BARBARA MATHEAS ABELE</b> 101, the last living founding member of Jack and Jill of America, Inc., of natural causes at the Stapeley Retirement Home in Philadelphia, according to a spokesman for the Terry Funeral Home in Philadelphia. Jack and Jill, the nation’s largest African-American family organization, was founded in 1938 by a group of mothers...JOHN H. MURPHY III, 94, former chairman of the board and publisher of the AFRO American Newspapers in Washington and Baltimore, died at the Stella Maris Nursing Home in Timonium, Md. ...Gospel and R&B singer JAMES PHELPS, 78, who performed with soul greats including Lou Rawls and Sam Cooke, died at a Los Angeles hospital, apparently from complications of diabetes...Prime Minister DAVID THOMPSON, 48, of Barbados, died at his private residence in St. Philip after struggling to beat pancreatic cancer most of the year.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />

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