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home medicine Broadens UF CLINIC AL AND TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH BUILDING RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES By Veronica Daniel Architect rendering of the University of Florida’s Clinical and Translational Research Building, which will house the UF Clinical and Translational Science Institute and UF Institute on Aging. C linical and translational research at the University of Florida is being transformed with the help of bricks and mortar. Research designed to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease in individuals and populations will have a new home: the 120,000-square-foot Clinical and Translational Research Building (CTRB) on the UF Health Science Center campus. University o cials broke ground on May 26 for the $45 million building, which is scheduled to be completed by March 2013. Located at the northeast corner of Mowry Road and Gale Lemerand Drive, the building will bring together researchers and clinicians from the Institute on Aging, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and other research and clinical programs. “It was very di cult to work with everyone spread about campus,” said Dr. Marco Pahor, director of the UF Institute on Aging and chairman of the department of aging and geriatric research. “We needed an operation that was all under one roof.” 110 HOME Living In the Heart of Florida

UF Clinical And Translational Research Building Broadens Research Opportunities

Veronica Daniel

Clinical and translational research at the University of Florida is being transformed - with the help of bricks and mortar.

Research designed to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease in individuals and populations will have a new home: the 120,000-square-foot Clinical and Translational Research Building (CTRB) on the UF Health Science Center campus.

University officials broke ground on May 26 for the $45 million building, which is scheduled to be completed by March 2013. Located at the northeast corner of Mowry Road and Gale Lemerand Drive, the building will bring together researchers and clinicians from the Institute on Aging, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and other research and clinical programs.

“It was very difficult to work with everyone spread about campus,” said Dr. Marco Pahor, director of the UF Institute on Aging and chairman of the department of aging and geriatric research. “We needed an operation that was all under one roof.”

A $15 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for the Institute on Aging facility was pivotal in getting the building off the ground. The CTSI also needed a building to house its research, because, like the Institute on Aging, its researchers were scattered around campus.

“UF had received several large clinical research grants in 2009, with no real place to do the work,” said Dr. David S. Guzick, UF senior vice president for health affairs and president of the UF&Shands Health System.

An opportunity arose to address the facility needs of UF’s clinical and translational science investigators after the Institute on Aging got its construction grant from the NIH National Center for Research Resources for a 40,000-square-foot building. Guzick and other university leaders came up with the idea to add another 80,000-squarefoot wing and pitched in an additional $30 million to triple the size of the original building.

“The overall mission of the CTSI is a simple one — to foster and speed the transformation of scientific discoveries into medical advances for patients, and the CTRB will play a central role in this mission,” said Dr. David Nelson, director of the CTSI. “It will foster collaboration, learning and discovery across multiple disciplines. It will represent a place where patients can come to help advance cures – a place where they can partner with their physicians to benefit their own health and the health of others.”

The CTRB will be a state-of-the-art clinical research hub that will cover a broad range of expertise in the areas of aging, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, dentistry, neuromedicine, muscular dystrophy and rare diseases. The building will also house a geriatrics specialty practice.

“Our communication is down just because of physical distance,” said Pahor. “We have several researchers who are studying the biology of aging and how physical activity and other lifestyle interventions can help older adults maintain their independence. It’s better if we’re all together when we’re working towards the same goal.”

The improvement of the facilities will help the institutes, and ultimately, the patients they serve.

“The new building will provide a multidisciplinary and collaborative home for research in clinical and population science across the Health Science Center campus,” said Guzick. “For example, the Institute on Aging wing will provide a one-stop facility that will make it easier for mobility-restricted older adults to take part in clinical trials.” The Clinical and Translational Science Institute’s outpatient research facility will occupy the first floor of the CTSI wing, which Guzick explained will simplify and expand access for research participants of all ages.

Designed by Perkins+Will, the building was featured at the World Architectural Festival in Barcelona last year as the only translational research facility of its kind in terms of innovation in design, sustainability and healthcare research.

The CTRB is a rare building that will be one of the “greenest” research facilities in the country. The only other building in the U.S. devoted to non-bench clinical and translational research is thought to be one that recently opened at the University of Rochester.

In the end, there are high hopes for the future of the building and the discoveries and strides the research conducted within its walls will make.

“When you bring brilliant minds, compassionate staff, thoughtful partners and willing patients together under one roof, all with a common goal of translating science into improved health,” said Guzick, “the possibilities to spur medical advances are endless.”

Read the full article at http://trendmag2.trendoffset.com/article/UF+Clinical+And+Translational+Research+Building+Broadens+Research+Opportunities/856558/84025/article.html.

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