All Points Bulletin Spring 2011 : Page 1

A LL P OINTS B ULLETIN VOLUME 21 • NUMBER 1 • SPRING 2011 The uniformed correctional of-ficer with blonde, short-cropped hair is walking through the Jeffer-son County Jail, tossing her side-swept bangs and telling her story of being accosted by an inmate. It’s almost a routine-sounding, day-in-the-life story of a correctional officer. Until she drops a bombshell: “You know,” she says, throwing her arms out for emphasis, “you don’t realize how much of a disad-vantage (it is) when you are seven months pregnant to a healthy 20-year-old male.” You just never know This is the story of how Jef-ferson County Sheriff’s Office Cor-rections Deputy Marie McClamma survived an ordeal that involved having her fingers slammed re-peatedly in a door jamb, taking several taser hits to the stomach, being kicked, punched and engag-ing in hand-to-hand combat with an inmate armed with scissors and bent on escape. For her heroism, courage and tenacity, Deputy McClamma was named the Florida Sheriffs Asso-ciation 2011 Correctional Officer of the Year. At FSA’s Mid-Winter Conference in January, more than 500 attend-ees – including Florida Gov. Rick Scott – sat spellbound as Deputy McClamma narrated the events of that day on video, replaying it from the inmate’s cell, to the wa-FLORIDA SHERIFFS Deputy Marie McClamma, Jefferson County “Correc-tional Officer of the Year” Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office Cor-rections Deputy Marie McClamma is congratulated by (from left) FSA President Harrell Reid, Florida Gover-nor Rick Scott, and Jefferson County Sheriff David Hobbs. Inside this issue: Bridging Theory and Practice: Broward SO and Nova Southeastern . . . page 5 Building an Effective Chaplaincy . . . page 6 LE Alert Plan . . . page 9 New Device Eliminates Need for Skid Pad . . . page 11 Project EmSeeQ: Citrus Better Tracking Wanderers . . . page 12 Stars & Stripes: Volusia Deputies Restore Victim’s Flag . . . page 15 ALL POINTS BULLETIN H SPRING 2011 ter fountain, to a holding cell and eventually the control room. The event happened on a Sun-day night – McClamma’s Friday – when she was about to go off shift. She was escorting the in-mate to the water fountain. He had never shown signs of aggression previously and offered no indica-tion of it as he approached the fountain. After taking a sip of water, though, he just froze – gripping the sides of the fountain. Deputy McClamma says she tried several restraint holds, but could not get him to comply. She reached for her radio, but he grabbed her hand and held it. They tussled until she was able to get him near a holding Continued on page 4 1

Deputy Marie McClamma, Jefferson County “Correctional Officer Of The Year”

The uniformed correctional officer with blonde, short-cropped hair is walking through the Jefferson County Jail, tossing her sideswept bangs and telling her story of being accosted by an inmate.It’s almost a routine-sounding, dayin- the-life story of a correctional officer.<br /> <br /> Until she drops a bombshell: “You know,” she says, throwing her arms out for emphasis, “you don’t realize how much of a disadvantage (it is) when you are seven months pregnant to a healthy 20-year-old male.” <br /> <br /> You just never know <br /> <br /> This is the story of how Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office Corrections Deputy Marie McClamma survived an ordeal that involved having her fingers slammed repeatedly in a door jamb, taking several taser hits to the stomach, being kicked, punched and engaging in hand-to-hand combat with an inmate armed with scissors and bent on escape.<br /> <br /> For her heroism, courage and tenacity, Deputy McClamma was named the Florida Sheriffs Association 2011 Correctional Officer of the Year.<br /> <br /> At FSA’s Mid-Winter Conference in January, more than 500 attendees – including Florida Gov. Rick Scott – sat spellbound as Deputy McClamma narrated the events of that day on video, replaying it from the inmate’s cell, to the water fountain, to a holding cell and eventually the control room.<br /> <br /> The event happened on a Sunday night – McClamma’s Friday – when she was about to go off shift. She was escorting the inmate to the water fountain. He had never shown signs of aggression previously and offered no indication of it as he approached the fountain.<br /> <br /> After taking a sip of water, though, he just froze – gripping the sides of the fountain. Deputy McClamma says she tried several restraint holds, but could not get him to comply. She reached for her radio, but he grabbed her hand and held it. They tussled until she was able to get him near a holding Cell. As she was trying to get the cell door closed, she started radioing, but the channel had been changed during the altercation, so no one heard her.<br /> <br /> Then the man came at her full force, and knocked her to the ground heading into the booking office – with her radio.<br /> <br /> “I got up and all I could think about was that if he locks me out of the booking office, it’s pretty much said and done with.It wouldn’t take him long to figure out how to work the board. Then he’s got keys to the arms room.”<br /> <br /> As the man was trying to close the door, McClamma gripped the edge of it and he started slamming her fingers against the frame. He let go briefly and she swung it open, only to find him standing inside holding a taser pointed at her stomach.<br /> <br /> Combat-worthy <br /> <br /> “It’s a struggle from then on,” she says, shaking her head, “it’s hand-to-hand, foot-to-foot – whatever you want to call it, it’s fighting. I’m thinking this inmate’s gonna try his best to kill me and he did.” <br /> <br /> The inmate kept telling her to let him out the door and then he hit and kicked her again, trying to stab her with some scissors before she wrestled them away.<br /> <br /> McClamma stood her ground, though. “I couldn’t open the doors and let him out,” she says.<br /> <br /> Other deputies came to the door and were able to restrain the inmate. Deputy McClamma was taken to the hospital where she spent two days recovering from the trauma.<br /> <br /> “It’s kind of hard to say what you’re going to do in a situation like that,” she says. “You’ve got to make choices; you’ve got to make a decision. Because not only your life depends on it, but your baby’s life depends on it.” <br /> <br /> Fighting back tears, Deputy Mc- Clamma drops her head and then regains her composure. Her face softens.<br /> <br /> “But, yeah, my Faith, she was born 7 lbs., 3 ounces – a big, healthy baby.” She smiles, eyes Peering from under her bangs, “I have that to be thankful for, I have my blessings.”<br /> <br /> Video online <br /> <br /> The Florida Sheriffs awarded Deputy McClamma a handsome plaque and check for $1,000. She also received personal congratulations from Governor Scott, who gave her a big hug after watching the video.<br /> <br /> FSA Executive Director Steve Casey also offered congratulations.<br /> <br /> “We offer thanks to the thousands of Florida corrections officers who work in our county jails,” he said. “Their jobs are dangerous and often go without recognition.We are honored to have the opportunity to help tell their story by highlighting the heroic actions of Jefferson County Corrections Deputy Marie McClamma.” <br /> <br /> Visit the Florida Sheriffs Association website to view the video of Deputy McClamma’s story: www.Flsheriffs.org (in the newsroom).

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