Newport Beach Independent October 20, 2017 : Page 3

newportbeachindy.com OCTOBER 20, 2017 3 Coyote Decoys in Harbor Aim to Deter Sea Lions By Sara Hall | NB Indy Wile. E. Coyote has a new adver-sary: Salty the Seal (or sea lion, in this case), and the city hopes the clever canine fi nally prevails. In a creative effort to deter sea lions from camping out on docks and boats, Newport Beach Harbor Opera-tions Division is placing plastic coyote decoys in problem spots around the harbor. Sea lions that haul out on ves-sels and docks can sometimes cause damage. The barking pinnipeds can be a nuisance to land-side neighbors as well. The city received 132 complaints about sea lions in July, 236 in August, and 148 in September. Harbormaster Dennis Durgan an-nounced the coyote decoy trial effort at the Harbor Commission meeting on Oct. 11. “They are working,” he said. There was a “large pile” of sea lions on the Coast Guard dock, which re-sulted in the nearby residents calling about the noise. “We took a couple coyotes down and placed them on the dock and they all jumped back into the pool,” Durgan said. The pair of artifi cial canines then followed the sea lions to a nearby sail-boat. The marine mammals report-edly then left the boat alone. This week, Durgan said that they have been seeing some overall success with the coyotes, although a few of the marine mammals wised up to the faux predators and were seen lying on a dock next to the decoys. The Harbormaster department is looking into possibly adding a scent to add to the realism and hopefully trick the sea lions in to staying away. This relatively new idea of coyote decoys is still in the conceptual phase, but city staff hopes to see a decrease in the sea lion population over the next few weeks. It’s a new method for the city, said Harbor Resources Manager Chris Miller this week. It’s just one more technique in the toolbox, he added. Other deterrents used include rail-ing, netting and buckets. A few years ago the department also tried a mo-tion activated water sprinkler called Scarecrow. The concept was based on evidence that sea lions do not like water sprayed on them while they are hauled out to sun, but it was a bit fi nicky and required maintenance. Deploying the coyote decoys came about after Durgan saw a local yacht club using them. “It’s just one piece,” Miller said. “All those things combined will hopefully make an impact.” The plan for this new idea is to move the eight decoys around the harbor as needed. Aboard vessels, they will be placed temporarily until the owner can secure their boat in a more permanent fashion, Miller explained. The coyotes are life-size and are posed in an attack stance, with their-backs arched and teeth bared. They are made out of a rubbery plastic with a furry tail. Each decoy is placed on a short stand that allows it to rotate in the wind. They also have a zip-tie to help secure them in place. Inspired by the Looney Tunes, city staff named each of the coyotes: Wile E. (the name that kicked off the theme), Bugs, Elmer, Sylvester, Yosem-ite, Taz, Marvin, and Babs. At about $25 per coyote, it’s an inexpensive approach to keeping the sea lions from potentially causing a lot more damage. Keeping on top of it is key, Miller said. The constant presence by har-bormaster team on the water around the harbor helps, he noted, as well as actively managing the boats that have problems. The sea lion season is generally from May to October, usually peak-ing in August. Although there are typically about 10 to 15 year-round residents in Newport. Harbor Commissioner Duncan Mc-Intosh can hear the sea lions barking from his house in the height, he noted in an email this week. At the Oct. 11 meeting, McIntosh said he sees live coyotes walking the streets around sunrise and early morning. “Put a leash on it and bring it on down,” Durgan joked. For more information, visit new-portbeachca.gov/government/depart-ments/public-works/harbor-resources/ sea-lions City Hosts Public Hearing on Koll Center Residences COURTESY THE CITY OF NEWPORT BEACH HALLOWEEN BASH An artist’s rendering of the Shopoff Group’s proposed development, Koll Center Residences, at Birch Street and Von Karman Avenue in Newport Beach. LIVE MUSIC: “Sega Genocide” In a message distributed on Wednes-day, Newport Beach city staff invited residents to an upcoming public hear-ing about the Koll Center Residences, a 260-unit mixed-use infi ll residential and retail development at Birch Street and Von Karman Avenue. Staff asked the applicant, Shopoff Group, to present the project to the community on Oct. 30 at 6 p.m., in the Friends Meeting Room of Newport Beach Central Library. The project site is approximately 13.16 acres within the Koll Center Newport, a 154-acre mixed-use devel-opment area located in the Koll Center Newport Planned Community in the airport area. The development includes up to 260 residential condominiums, 3,000 square feet of ground-fl oor retail uses, a 1.17-acre public park, a free-standing parking structure, and the reconfi gu-ration of some of the existing surface parking areas. The residences would be in three, 13-story residential buildings. The buildings would be up to 160 feet in height with two levels of above-grade and two to three levels of below-grade structured parking. The public park would be located adjacent to Birch Street. Construction would occur over ap-proximately four and a half year period. Implementation of the Proposed Project would require the demolition of existing surface parking and landscap-ing within the limits of disturbance. The city also announced on Wednes-day that the public comment period for review of Draft Environmental Impact Report on the Koll project has been extended until Nov. 3 A number of issues are addressed in the draft EIR, including air quality, soil, traffi c and noise, some of which could have potential long term impacts. The draft ERI also suggests mitigation mea-sures to reduce the impacts to “levels considered less than signifi cant with the exception of air quality impacts, land use impacts, and construction-related noise impacts.” Saturday, Oct. 28th 10pm Dancing • Costume Contest • Prizes $10 Cover Costa Mesa’s oldest Premier Steakhouse Reservations Recommended • Walk-Ins Always Welcome 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa • www.lacaverestaurant.com Like Us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram (949) 646-7944

Coyote Decoys In Harbor Aim To Deter Sea Lions

Sara Hall | NB Indy

Wile. E. Coyote has a new adversary: Salty the Seal (or sea lion, in this case), and the city hopes the clever canine finally prevails.<br /> <br /> In a creative effort to deter sea lions from camping out on docks and boats, Newport Beach Harbor Operations Division is placing plastic coyote decoys in problem spots around the harbor.<br /> <br /> Sea lions that haul out on vessels and docks can sometimes cause damage. The barking pinnipeds can be a nuisance to land-side neighbors as well.<br /> <br /> The city received 132 complaints about sea lions in July, 236 in August, and 148 in September.<br /> <br /> Harbormaster Dennis Durgan announced the coyote decoy trial effort at the Harbor Commission meeting on Oct. 11.<br /> <br /> “They are working,” he said. There was a “large pile” of sea lions on the Coast Guard dock, which resulted in the nearby residents calling about the noise.<br /> <br /> “We took a couple coyotes down and placed them on the dock and they all jumped back into the pool,” Durgan said.<br /> <br /> The pair of artificial canines then followed the sea lions to a nearby sailboat. The marine mammals reportedly then left the boat alone.<br /> <br /> This week, Durgan said that they have been seeing some overall success with the coyotes, although a few of the marine mammals wised up to the faux predators and were seen lying on a dock next to the decoys.<br /> <br /> The Harbormaster department is looking into possibly adding a scent to add to the realism and hopefully trick the sea lions in to staying away.<br /> <br /> This relatively new idea of coyote decoys is still in the conceptual phase, but city staff hopes to see a decrease in the sea lion population over the next few weeks.<br /> <br /> It’s a new method for the city, said Harbor Resources Manager Chris Miller this week. It’s just one more technique in the toolbox, he added.<br /> <br /> Other deterrents used include railing, netting and buckets. A few years ago the department also tried a motion activated water sprinkler called Scarecrow. The concept was based on evidence that sea lions do not like water sprayed on them while they are hauled out to sun, but it was a bit finicky and required maintenance.<br /> <br /> Deploying the coyote decoys came about after Durgan saw a local yacht club using them.<br /> <br /> “It’s just one piece,” Miller said. “All those things combined will hopefully make an impact.”<br /> <br /> The plan for this new idea is to move the eight decoys around the harbor as needed. Aboard vessels, they will be placed temporarily until the owner can secure their boat in a more permanent fashion, Miller explained.<br /> <br /> The coyotes are life-size and are posed in an attack stance, with theirbacks arched and teeth bared. They are made out of a rubbery plastic with a furry tail. Each decoy is placed on a short stand that allows it to rotate in the wind. They also have a zip-tie to help secure them in place.<br /> <br /> Inspired by the Looney Tunes, city staff named each of the coyotes: Wile E. (the name that kicked off the theme), Bugs, Elmer, Sylvester, Yosemite, Taz, Marvin, and Babs.<br /> <br /> At about $25 per coyote, it’s an inexpensive approach to keeping the sea lions from potentially causing a lot more damage.<br /> <br /> Keeping on top of it is key, Miller said. The constant presence by harbormaster team on the water around the harbor helps, he noted, as well as actively managing the boats that have problems.<br /> <br /> The sea lion season is generally from May to October, usually peaking in August. Although there are typically about 10 to 15 year-round residents in Newport.<br /> <br /> Harbor Commissioner Duncan Mc- Intosh can hear the sea lions barking from his house in the height, he noted in an email this week.<br /> <br /> At the Oct. 11 meeting, McIntosh said he sees live coyotes walking the streets around sunrise and early morning.<br /> <br /> “Put a leash on it and bring it on down,” Durgan joked.<br /> <br /> For more information, visit newportbeachca. gov/government/departments/ public-works/harbor-resources/ sea-lions<br />

City Hosts Public Hearing On Koll Center Residences

In a message distributed on Wednesday, Newport Beach city staff invited residents to an upcoming public hearing about the Koll Center Residences, a 260-unit mixed-use infill residential and retail development at Birch Street and Von Karman Avenue.<br /> <br /> Staff asked the applicant, Shopoff Group, to present the project to the community on Oct. 30 at 6 p.m., in the Friends Meeting Room of Newport Beach Central Library.<br /> <br /> The project site is approximately 13. 16 acres within the Koll Center Newport, a 154-acre mixed-use development area located in the Koll Center Newport Planned Community in the airport area.<br /> <br /> The development includes up to 260 residential condominiums, 3,000 square feet of ground-floor retail uses, a 1.17-acre public park, a free-standing parking structure, and the reconfiguration of some of the existing surface parking areas.<br /> <br /> The residences would be in three, 13-story residential buildings. The buildings would be up to 160 feet in height with two levels of above-grade and two to three levels of below-grade structured parking. The public park would be located adjacent to Birch Street.<br /> <br /> Construction would occur over approximately four and a half year period.<br /> <br /> Implementation of the Proposed Project would require the demolition of existing surface parking and landscaping within the limits of disturbance.<br /> <br /> The city also announced on Wednesday that the public comment period for review of Draft Environmental Impact Report on the Koll project has been extended until Nov. 3 <br /> <br /> A number of issues are addressed in the draft EIR, including air quality, soil, traffic and noise, some of which could have potential long term impacts. The draft ERI also suggests mitigation measures to reduce the impacts to “levels considered less than significant with the exception of air quality impacts, land use impacts, and construction-related noise impacts.”<br />

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