Newport Beach Independent August 11, 2017 : Page 3

newportbeachindy.com AUGUST 11, 2017 3 New Chief on NBFD’s History of Innovation SARA HALL By Sara Hall | NB Indy Newport Beach Fire Department Chief Chip Duncan spoke to about 40 people Wednesday during Speak Up Newport’s monthly meeting. Duncan was appointed as interim fire chief earlier this year and was recently promoted to the top of the department. He feels incredibly lucky, he said. The new chief went over some inter-esting numbers during the meeting. Every day there are 38 firefighters on duty covering 26 square miles, Duncan explained. The department responded to 11,826 total calls in 2016. Hitting that 10,000 barrier was a big deal a few years ago, he noted. The number of total calls has increased at a trend of approximately three percent each year, he added. Average response time is 3 minutes and 42 seconds. “We’re pretty proud of that,” Duncan said. During the busy summers or on the far end of the peninsula can be a bit tough, he said. Duncan also pointed out that the department generates $3.8 million in revenue, primarily through billing insurance companies and medicare. This offsets a small portion of NBFD’s $48 million budget, which includes the lifeguards, he explained. During the rest of his presentation, innovation was the word of the night. “We have a history of innovation in the fire department in Newport Beach,” Duncan said. Newport Beach created a volunteer fire department in 1911 and it became one of the first paid departments in 1927. Striving to stay ahead of the curve recently landed them on the cover of the national “Journal of Emergency Medical Services” magazine in May. The feature focused on the field implementation of +EMS and the Search, Alert, File and Reconcile model for health information exchange, which provides a patient’s medical informa-tion at providers’ fingertips within seconds. Newport Beach was the only fire department in the country doing the program, Duncan confirmed as the audience applauded. “Being on the forefront of innovation is important,” Duncan said. “It helps us drive what the next big thing is going to be.” Duncan mentioned the 2012 Orange County grand jury report, “Emergency Medical Response in Orange County: Where did all the ‘fires’ go? Long time passing. Apologies to Pete Seeger.” The grand jury criticized fire depart-ments that, although the vast majority of calls were medical emergencies, have not changed their response operation models. Newport Beach Fire Department Chief Chip Duncan talks about the department’s history of innovation during Speak Up Newport’s monthly meeting Wednesday. “The emergency response commu-nities have discussed developing new models, but little change has been ac-complished,” the grand jury wrote. Authors of the report recommended re-evaluating the response models by independent outside consultants. “That, in my humble opinion… has never been the way we operated here in our city,” Duncan noted. Newport has had a strong focus on the medical side for more than 50 years, he said. They began advanced first aid in the 1960s and had emergency medical tech-nicians on board by the 1970s. By 1975, the department had eight firefighters graduate as certified paramedics. In 1996, NBFD implemented paramedic transportation system. The department has slowly pro-gressed into doing more emergency medical services over the years, Duncan said. About 80 percent of the NBFD incidents have a medical component, he noted. For more information, visit newport-beachca.gov/government/departments/ fire-department and speakupnewport. com. L.A. Bishop Guilty of Misconduct in Newport Case By Sara Hall | NB Indy The Los Angeles Bishop who at-tempted to sell a Newport Beach church property and locked the parish out two years ago was found guilty of miscon-duct last week. In 2015, L.A. Diocesan Bishop J. Jon Bruno attempted to sell St James the Great Episcopal Church, located at Via Lido and 32nd Street on the Balboa Peninsula, to Legacy Partners for $15 million. The deal eventually fell through. Bruno evicted the church members and locked them out of the Lido parish. Regarding his conduct in the attempt to sale the church property, charges were brought against Bruno. An ecclesiasti-cal trial was held in March in Pasadena. The hearing was investigating allega-tions against Bruno concerning conduct involving dishonest, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation, conduct unbecom-ing a member of the clergy, and failure to exercise his ministry in accordance with the Constitution and Canons of the Church. Earlier this year, despite a sanction imposed upon him by the panel restrict-ing him from acting in any capacity on behalf of St. James (a measure Bruno appealed and lost), Bruno secretly entered a contract of sale with Newport Beach-based developer Burnham Ward Properties, LLC. Church officials discov-ered the planned sale and prohibited it from closing. In an order released Aug. 2 by the Episcopal Church hearing panel, they recommended three years suspen-sion for Bruno from all ministry and removing all authority over the church property. The decision also immedi-ately suspends any efforts to sell St. James, restores congregation and vicar to the church building, and reassigns St. James appropriate mission status. “We are deeply honored by the commitment and consideration of all involved and continue to pray for the reopening of our doors and return to our beloved sanctuary,” church officials wrote on social media on Aug. 3. Another notable comment in the re-port, is that the hearing panel declined to depose Bruno. The panel concluded that he at-tempted to sell the property without the previous consent of the stand-ing committee, and along the way he misrepresented certain matters, and that certain features of his conduct are unbecoming of a member of the clergy, the order explains. Earlier in the week, Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry issued “further partial restriction” on Bruno. The Aug. 1 action removed Bruno’s jurisdiction “over all matters related to the St. James real and personal prop-erty, the congregation, and the vicar.” Premier Quality and Service Since 1962 Monday through ursday 5:00pm to 7:00pm New York Strip – $29 Fresh Sword sh – $29 Rib Eye Steak – $29 Includes our famous Garlic Cheese Bread, Soup or Salad, Twice-Baked-Cheese-Stu ed Potato, Baked Potato or Rice Pilaf. Sunset Dinners PRIME RIB AVAILABLE SATURDA NIGHTS! 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New Chief On NBFD’s History Of Innovation

Sara Hall

Newport Beach Fire Department Chief Chip Duncan spoke to about 40 people Wednesday during Speak Up Newport’s monthly meeting.<br /> <br /> Duncan was appointed as interim fire chief earlier this year and was recently promoted to the top of the department. He feels incredibly lucky, he said.<br /> <br /> The new chief went over some interesting numbers during the meeting.<br /> <br /> Every day there are 38 firefighters on duty covering 26 square miles, Duncan explained.<br /> <br /> The department responded to 11,826 total calls in 2016. Hitting that 10,000 barrier was a big deal a few years ago, he noted. The number of total calls has increased at a trend of approximately three percent each year, he added.<br /> <br /> Average response time is 3 minutes and 42 seconds.<br /> <br /> “We’re pretty proud of that,” Duncan said.<br /> <br /> During the busy summers or on the far end of the peninsula can be a bit tough, he said.<br /> <br /> Duncan also pointed out that the department generates $3.8 million in revenue, primarily through billing insurance companies and medicare. This offsets a small portion of NBFD’s $48 million budget, which includes the lifeguards, he explained.<br /> <br /> During the rest of his presentation, innovation was the word of the night.<br /> <br /> “We have a history of innovation in the fire department in Newport Beach,” Duncan said.<br /> <br /> Newport Beach created a volunteer fire department in 1911 and it became one of the first paid departments in 1927.<br /> <br /> Striving to stay ahead of the curve recently landed them on the cover of the national “Journal of Emergency Medical Services” magazine in May.<br /> <br /> The feature focused on the field implementation of +EMS and the Search, Alert, File and Reconcile model for health information exchange, which provides a patient’s medical information at providers’ fingertips within seconds.<br /> <br /> Newport Beach was the only fire department in the country doing the program, Duncan confirmed as the audience applauded.<br /> <br /> “Being on the forefront of innovation is important,” Duncan said. “It helps us drive what the next big thing is going to be.”<br /> <br /> Duncan mentioned the 2012 Orange County grand jury report, “Emergency Medical Response in Orange County: Where did all the ‘fires’ go? Long time passing. Apologies to Pete Seeger.”<br /> <br /> The grand jury criticized fire departments that, although the vast majority of calls were medical emergencies, have not changed their response operation models.<br /> <br /> “The emergency response communities have discussed developing new models, but little change has been accomplished,” the grand jury wrote.<br /> <br /> Authors of the report recommended re-evaluating the response models by independent outside consultants.<br /> <br /> “That, in my humble opinion… has never been the way we operated here in our city,” Duncan noted.<br /> <br /> Newport has had a strong focus on the medical side for more than 50 years, he said.<br /> <br /> They began advanced first aid in the 1960s and had emergency medical technicians on board by the 1970s. By 1975, the department had eight firefighters graduate as certified paramedics. In 1996, NBFD implemented paramedic transportation system.<br /> <br /> The department has slowly progressed into doing more emergency medical services over the years, Duncan said. About 80 percent of the NBFD incidents have a medical component, he noted.<br /> <br /> For more information, visit newportbeachca. gov/government/departments/fire-department and speakupnewport.com.<br />

L.A. Bishop Guilty Of Misconduct In Newport Case

Sara Hall

The Los Angeles Bishop who attempted to sell a Newport Beach church property and locked the parish out two years ago was found guilty of misconduct last week.<br /> <br /> In 2015, L.A. Diocesan Bishop J. Jon Bruno attempted to sell St James the Great Episcopal Church, located at Via Lido and 32nd Street on the Balboa Peninsula, to Legacy Partners for $15 million. The deal eventually fell through.<br /> <br /> Bruno evicted the church members and locked them out of the Lido parish.<br /> <br /> Regarding his conduct in the attempt to sale the church property, charges were brought against Bruno. An ecclesiastical trial was held in March in Pasadena. The hearing was investigating allegations against Bruno concerning conduct involving dishonest, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation, conduct unbecoming a member of the clergy, and failure to exercise his ministry in accordance with the Constitution and Canons of the Church.<br /> <br /> Earlier this year, despite a sanction imposed upon him by the panel restricting him from acting in any capacity on behalf of St. James (a measure Bruno appealed and lost), Bruno secretly entered a contract of sale with Newport Beach-based developer Burnham Ward Properties, LLC. Church officials discovered the planned sale and prohibited it from closing.<br /> <br /> In an order released Aug. 2 by the Episcopal Church hearing panel, they recommended three years suspension for Bruno from all ministry and removing all authority over the church property. The decision also immediately suspends any efforts to sell St. James, restores congregation and vicar to the church building, and reassigns St. James appropriate mission status.<br /> <br /> “We are deeply honored by the commitment and consideration of all involved and continue to pray for the reopening of our doors and return to our beloved sanctuary,” church officials wrote on social media on Aug. 3.<br /> <br /> Another notable comment in the report, is that the hearing panel declined to depose Bruno.<br /> <br /> The panel concluded that he attempted to sell the property without the previous consent of the standing committee, and along the way he misrepresented certain matters, and that certain features of his conduct are unbecoming of a member of the clergy, the order explains.<br /> <br /> Earlier in the week, Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry issued “further partial restriction” on Bruno.<br /> <br /> The Aug. 1 action removed Bruno’s jurisdiction “over all matters related to the St. James real and personal property, the congregation, and the vicar.”<br />

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