Diablo Magazine February 2018 : Page 29

Books reading roundup clo ck w ise fro m to p l ef t: H a r perco l l i ns; i n g r a m pu b l isH er serv i ces; r a n d o m H o use; H e y day; co nso r t i u m bo o k sa l e s & d i s t r i bu t i o n; m acm i l l a n; r a n d o m H o use Cozy Reads Stay warm this winter with these page-turners by local authors. By Linda Lenhoff As the temperAture drops in the East Bay, what better way to pass the chilly evenings than settling in by the fireplace with a good book? Local authors have once again come through with selections to entice even the fussiest reader. Pick one up at a local bookstore— Orinda Books, A Great Good Place for Books in Montclair, or Rakestraw Books in Danville—and cozy up for a riveting read. a For the Grown-Ups: Tell Me More By Kelly Corrigan With her usual warm, self-deprecating humor, New York Times best-selling author Kelly Corrigan invites us into her life as a parent, daughter, and devoted friend, invoking all its funny and some-times painful details. Corrigan, who lives in Piedmont, bases each essay on a saying she uses to help establish boundaries, embrace loss, and greet each experience with compassion and love. (Chapter head-ings include “I Don’t Know” and “I Was Settle in for a relaxing night at home with these captivating books by local authors. Diablo 29

Winter Reads

Linda Lenhoff

Cozy Reads<br /> <br /> Stay warm this winter with these page-turners by local authors.<br /> <br /> As the temperature drops in the East Bay, what better way to pass the chilly evenings than settling in by the fireplace with a good book? Local authors have once again come through with selections to entice even the fussiest reader. Pick one up at a local bookstore— Orinda Books, A Great Good Place for Books in Montclair, or Rakestraw Books in Danville—and cozy up for a riveting read.<br /> <br /> For the Grown-Ups:<br /> <br /> TELL ME MORE<br /> <br /> By Kelly Corrigan<br /> <br /> With her usual warm, self-deprecating humor, New York Times best-selling author Kelly Corrigan invites us into her life as a parent, daughter, and devoted friend, invoking all its funny and sometimes painful details. Corrigan, who lives in Piedmont, bases each essay on a saying she uses to help establish boundaries, embrace loss, and greet each experience with compassion and love. (Chapter headings include “I Don’t Know” and “I Was<br /> <br /> capital firm Kleiner Perkins, suing the company for discrimination toward women and minorities. In this memoir, the daughter of Chinese immigrants details her fight as a working woman in the technology field and argues why we need to reset.<br /> <br /> Sourdough<br /> <br /> By Robin Sloan<br /> <br /> Following the success of his critically lauded debut, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, Oakland author Robin Sloan returns with another surrealistically fun novel: Sourdough. Engineer Lois Clary leaves her day job after an encounter with a magical sourdough starter, and enters a secret world of foodies who aim to merge foodstuffs and robotics—with bizarre results. Sloan’s writing is again crisp and delicious, leaving us with an appetite for more.<br /> <br /> For the Younger Crowd:<br /> <br /> Living Wild<br /> <br /> By Elaine Miller Bond<br /> <br /> In her latest book, Orinda photographer and renowned science writer Elaine Miller Bond asks: “Where is your favorite place to be?” This lovingly put-together instant classic introduces youngsters to the various places that foxes, butterflies, songbirds, and other creatures call home, via Bond’s photographs of animals in their natural habitats.<br /> <br /> Lovely<br /> <br /> By Jess Hong<br /> <br /> Berkeley’s Creston Books colors outside the lines with Oakland author Jess Hong’s Lovely, a picture book about diversity and acceptance. The wonderfully illustrated story expresses the ways in which all of us—the big, small, loud, quiet, smooth, and wrinkly—are truly lovely.<br /> <br /> You Bring the Distant Near<br /> <br /> By Mitali Perkins<br /> <br /> Orinda resident and children’s author Mitali Perkins—who brought us Tiger Boy and Rickshaw Girl—takes her first step into young adult fiction with this humorous book, which was nominated for a National Book Award last year. Spanning three generations of an Indian-American family, the story follows five women as they struggle to balance friendship, love, and identity with their culture and traditions. ■<br />

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