AdvocateMag Preston Hollow July 2012 : Page 31

a special advertising section Presented by most used logo used fo r small ver tical and social media black and white of 2012 The Big idea 31 · ShifTing gearS 34 · SUCCeSS STOrieS 36 used for small hor izontal be local be local 1/2 The Big idea: How local women turned passions into professions said, ‘Wow, there’s a lot of math and science in there, I’m not sure Very few can say they are passionate about their work, which that’s for you, honey.’ ” Undaunted, Taylor explored the program is why the stories featured in these pages are so inspiring. These at LSU, and plunged ahead. “I was fascinated women have identified their individual pas -by all the things landscape architecture encom-sions and transformed them into successful passed,” she says. “It was the perfect fit for me.” careers. In 1984 she founded her company, Roundtree Johnette Taylor of Roundtree Landscap-Landscaping. Today she manages a busy staff ing is every bit as passionate, but she always knew she’d rather work outside of four – J ohnette t aylor and a full agenda, serving commercial and resi-dential properties. walls. “I looked at forestry and some dif-r oundtree l andscaping Dr. Debbie Shirico of Total Hearing Care ferent options, and had never really heard found her life’s work during a summer gig at Li-of landscape architecture, until a friend of on’s Camp for Crippled Children. “I fell in love with some of the mine in high school said, ‘I think this is something you would deaf children there,” she says. “I decided I wanted to work with enjoy. Look into it.’ ” Initially Taylor’s mother was skeptical. “She “It was the perfect fit for me.” JULY 2012 special advert ising section 31

Outstanding Businesswomen Celebrates Local Business Women

The Big idea: How local women turned passions into professions<br /> <br /> Very few can say they are passionate about their work, which is why the stories featured in these pages are so inspiring. These women have identified their individual passions and transformed them into successful careers.<br /> <br /> Johnette Taylor of Roundtree Landscaping is every bit as passionate, but she always knew she’d rather work outside of four walls. “I looked at forestry and some different options, and had never really heard of landscape architecture, until a friend of mine in high school said, ‘I think this is something you would enjoy. Look into it.’ ” Initially Taylor’s mother was skeptical. “She said, ‘Wow, there’s a lot of math and science in there, I’m not sure that’s for you, honey.’ ” Undaunted, Taylor explored the program at LSU, and plunged ahead. “I was fascinated by all the things landscape architecture encompassed,” she says. “It was the perfect fit for me.” In 1984 she founded her company, Roundtree Landscaping. Today she manages a busy staff and a full agenda, serving commercial and residential properties.<br /> <br /> Dr. Debbie Shirico of Total Hearing Care found her life’s work during a summer gig at Lion’s Camp for Crippled Children. “I fell in love with some of the deaf children there,” she says. “I decided I wanted to work with Deaf kids, so I went into audiology (the science of hearing).” She kids and understanding deaf culture. “It’s like a whole world of its own. Learning how the deaf think and interact is like landing on a new island in another country.” Her career path took her through diagnostic testing and ultimately led her to hearing aids.<br /> <br /> “I love helping people hear and putting a smile on their face,” Hoto pe bas tera naam hai Dr.shirico says ultimately she felt confident enough to take a chance on acquiring an existing hearing aid business in East Dal- Las. " when I bought the office there were plastic pictures and ized back in 1990, when most people weren’t doing that. Today Our office is completetely paperless.: her business strategy proved successful, and soon she opened a second location in North Dallas.“We provide an extensive amount of counseling to help the family learn to deal with hearing loss, and we teach compensation techniques to help them manage easier.”<br /> <br /> For Realtor Vicki White, a career was born from channeling a favorite childhood pastime into a successful occupation. “When I was little, on vacation I would always look at old houses on the side of the highway and envision them remodeled,” White Says. Latter, as a wife and mother, she begen flipping houses.”we moved 21 times,” she says. “It got a little labor intensive. So then I started a staging business, helping people sell homes.” She acquired an inventory of furniture and staged for all price ranges, including a $3 million dollar home on Lawther. Eventually she Was ready for a new challenge and committed to getting her real estate license. Now she works at the business she loves from all angles and attributes her success to her strong work ethic.<br /> <br /> Local Realtor and business owner Elizabeth Mast approached her real estate business from a different direction. Ten years ago she opened the eclectic boutique Talulah Belle, which she considers her “hobby,” because it was her way of exercising creativ-wanted to stay in the community and the neighborhood more,”“Now, in real estate I can leverage all of my negotiation skills And management skills that I took from finance, and my flair for design from the store, and all of the relationships with vendors and designers. I’m not only selling houses, but I’m staging and consulting, which really drives how quickly you can sell the house.” How quickly? Mast has only been in the business for a Couple of months and has already closed her first deal.<br /> <br /> Shifting Gears:<br /> <br /> There was a time when a career change seemed like a radical decision, but over the past decade changes in technology and economics have transformed the landscape. Whether by choice or necessity, career changes are more common — and more desirable — than they used to be.<br /> <br /> Local business owner Meghan Adams trained to be a broadcast journalist, lived in Washington, D.C., worked on “Nightline,” and even interned at the White House. It was an exciting beginning, but soon family pressures and several relocations took their toll. When she found herself back in Texas and closer to her family, she brainstormed with her sister, and soon the two opened a business: The Hospitality Sweet.<br /> <br /> “we started our business right after we each had our first baby, so we could stay home with them and still do something creative,” says Adams, who has always enjoyed cooking. She thought there might be some toward sweets. “Cakes, cookies, cupcakes, cake balls — and we also do hors d’oeuvres and box lunches.” This past year, when Dr. Phil turned thousand cake balls for him,” Adams says.<br /> <br /> Until recently, customers have picked up orders from Adams’ home, but this year the business has set up shop in London Café inside Timothy Oulton at Potter Square. Although they still take special orders, Adams says, “Now people will be able to come into the store and buy our sweets, rather than having to order a day ahead.”<br /> <br /> Success Stories: Tips for women in business<br /> <br /> Many women have toyed with the idea of starting their own businesses, but how do you know when the time is right? And once established, how do you ensure triumph? These local businesswomen have paved the way and share their secrets to success.<br /> <br /> Established dentist Dr. Kelli Slate says she knew it was time to open her own practice when she realized she wanted more stability in the workplace. Slate, who was a hygienist at the time, found herself thinking she could do her boss’s job as well or better than he did.<br /> <br /> “That light bulb went off in my head,” Slate says. “So at age 32, I went back to four more years of college and furthered my education In my field and become a dentist. I would encourage women to do. that, if you reach that point in your career.” After dental school, she bought an existing practice and made her dreams come true.<br /> <br /> For local business owner Lorraine Wire of Hance Paint and Body, The circumstances were quite different. In 2011, five years after she and her husband relocated to Dallas, Wire unexpectedly found herself a widow and sole owner of the auto shop. “I didn’t have a choice about being in this career,” Wire says. “This business was doing well at the time, and I knew I could continue doing it.” With the help of her employees and a strong faith, Wire persevered.<br /> <br /> “I grew up very underprivileged,” says Wire, who is from North Carolina. “If you really knew my background, and what all I have accomplished and done, it’s an amazing story. But I didn’t do it on My own. Everything I’ve had and done has been by the grace of God.” Wire also credits her employees. “They are good, capable,Qualified employees, and they take care of business.”<br /> <br /> Another factor in Wire’s success is her strong service ethic. “We Always want to make sure the customer is happy, satisfied and that they want to come back to this shop. You know everyboby needs a Doctor and a hairdresser, and so forth.Eventually, most people are going to need a good body shop,” she says, with an optimistic smile.<br /> <br /> Maintaining an appropriate work/life balance has played an important part in the success of Dr. Ashly Cothern, DDS. As a dentist and business owner, she says, “If I’m not here then The ship doesn't float she herself .. this way: “Foremost I’m a wife and I’m a mom, and after that I’m blessed to be a dentist.” With small children at home,<br /> <br /> Johnette Taylor of Roundtree Landscaping operates by the Gold Golden Rule of business. “I treat people the way I want to be treated, and I expect the same in return,” she says. In the early days of her busi-Ness she took her husband along to help her make a decision anout a truck purchase, instead of to . "my husband kept saying, 'talk to her, she's one buying the truck.' The salesman saidto my husband.” When somebody treats her that way, Taylor says, she doesn’t do business with them, and she is mindful of the lesson when she interacts with her clients and associates.<br /> <br /> What if you happened to start your business on September 10,2001, one day before 9/11? Kelly Harris, who owns her Farmers In- Surance office, had that experience. "I got my insurance licurance license the foest Week of that September." Harris says. It was definitely." Herriis says . "it was definitely interesting timing." In addition, at that time the insurance industry was trying to find so;utions to the black mold debacle.<br /> <br /> How did harris's office survive the the turmoil ? "we found other areas to focus on." She says. "a lot of agents didn't make it through that time . But we looked beyonf that."

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