AdvocateMag Lakewood July 2012 : Page 67

A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION SPONSORED BY D ENTISTRY IN THE H EART OF L AKEWOOD PRESENTED BY of 2012 THE BIG IDEA 67 · SHIFTING GEARS 72 · SUCCESS STORIES 77 · THE GREAT DIVIDE 81 Dr. Kelli Slate turned her passion into a reality by returning to school to become a dentist. The Big Idea: How local women turned passions into professions She began in Deep Ellum, but eventually moved to Lake-Very few can say they are passionate about their work, wood where she strove to cultivate a grass-roots neighborhood which is why the stories featured in these pages are so inspir-QVO&#16;&#03;<PM[M&#03;_WUMV&#03;PI^M&#03;QLMV\QÅML&#03;\PMQZ&#03;QVLQ^QL]IT&#03;XI[[QWV[&#03;IVL&#03; feeling. “I wanted to be where we could get involved in the local scene, where all the stylists could live in transformed them into successful careers. the neighborhood, and where people could “I love what I do; I truly love what I do,” just hang out,” Dittmar says. Several years says Karen Dittmar of Willie and Coote later, she has succeeded. “We have people Salon. “It’s like being an artist every day.” who come here in their pajamas, with their After more than 10 years styling hair, – K AREN D ITTMAR OF coffee in the morning and get their hair cut,” Karen found herself inspired by a vintage photograph of her mother and aunt (the W ILLIE AND C OOTE S ALON she says, with unmistakable pride. Nearby, local dentist Dr. Kelli Slate turned salon is named after the infamous duo). “It her passion into a reality by returning to looked like they were having so much fun, school to become a dentist. Now an established professional, and I wanted to have a salon that was fun and laid-back and Dr. Slate advises “Don’t be afraid to advertise. It’s critical to different.” “I love what I do; I truly love what I do” JULY 2012 special advert i s ing sect ion 67

The Big Idea

How local women turned passions into professions<br /> <br /> “I love what I do; I truly love what I do” – KAREN DITTMAR OF WILLIE AND COOTE SALON<br /> <br /> Very few can say they are passionate about their work, which is why the stories featured in these pages are so inspiring. These women have identified their individual passions and transformed them into successful careers.<br /> <br /> “I love what I do; I truly love what I do,” says Karen Dittmar of Willie and Coote Salon. “It’s like being an artist every day.” After more than 10 years styling hair, Karen found herself inspired by a vintage photograph of her mother and aunt (the salon is named after the infamous duo). “It looked like they were having so much fun, and I wanted to have a salon that was fun and laid-back and different.” <br /> <br /> She began in Deep Ellum, but eventually moved to Lakewood where she strove to cultivate a grass-roots neighborhood feeling. “I wanted to be where we could get involved in the local scene, where all the stylists could live in the neighborhood, and where people could just hang out,” Dittmar says. Several years later, she has succeeded. “We have people who come here in their pajamas, with their coffee in the morning and get their hair cut,” she says, with unmistakable pride.<br /> <br /> Nearby, local dentist Dr. Kelli Slate turned her passion into a reality by returning to school to become a dentist. Now an established professional, Dr. Slate advises “Don’t be afraid to advertise. It’s critical to Get your name out there.” Dr. Slate says she was grateful to have solid family support when she returned to school, which is one path to success, but not the only path.<br /> <br /> Dr. Debbie Shirico of Total Hearing Care found her life’s work during a summer gig at Lion’s Camp for Crippled Children. “I fell in love with some of the deaf children there,” she says. “I decided I wanted to work with deaf kids, so I went into audiology (the science of hearing)." She became fluent in sign language and enjoyed working with deaf kids and understanding deaf culture. “It’s like a whole world of its own. Learning how the deaf think and interact is like landing on a new island in another country.” Her career path took her through diagnostic testing and ultimately led her to hearing aids.<br /> <br /> “I love helping people hear and putting a smile on their face'" Dr.Shirico says. Ultimately she felt confident enough to take a chance on acquiring an existing hearing aid business in east dallas. "When i bought the office there were plasic pictures and plastic furniture," she says. "I fixed it up and got it all computerized back in 1990, when most people weren't doing that. Today our office is completely paperless." Her busines strategy proved successful, and soon she opened a second location in North Dallas. "We procide an extensive amount of counseling to help the family learn to deal with hearing loss, and we teach compensation techniques to help them manage easier."<br /> <br /> For Realtor Vicki White, a career was born from channeling a favorite childhood pastime into a successful occupation. "When I was little, on vacation Iwould always look at old houses on the side of the highway and envision them remodeled," White says. Later, as a wife and mother, she began fliping houses. "We moved 21 times," she says. "It got a little Labor-intensive. So then I started a staging business, helping People sell homes.” She acquired an inventory of furniture and staged for all price ranges, including a $3 million dollar home on Lawther. Eventually she was ready for a new challenge and committed to getting her real estate license. Now she works at the business she loves from all angles and attributes her success to her strong work ethic.<br /> <br /> Local Realtor and business owner Elizabeth Mast approached her real estate business from a different direction. Ten years ago she opened the eclectic boutique Talulah Belle in Lakewood, which she considers her “hobby,” because it was her way of exercising creativity outside of her 26-year career in finance. “I decided I really wanted to stay in the community and the neighborhood more,” Mast says, explaining why she chose to leave finance behind. “Now, in real estate I can leverage all of my negotiation skills and management skills that I took from finance, and my flair for design from the store, and all of the relationships with vendors and designers. I’m not only selling houses, but I’m staging and consulting, which really drives how quickly you can sell the house.” How quickly? Mast has only been in the business for a couple of months and has already closed her first deal.<br /> <br /> Some women are just born entrepreneurs. Shea Boothe- Wood of TrueBeautyRx in Lakewood can’t seem to stop starting new ventures. In January she opened a second shop called 2•shea Boutique (pronounced like the French “touché”). Unlike her first shop, which focuses completely on skin care, 2•shea Boutique has allowed Boothe-Wood to widen her range. “We have a spa treatment room at 2•shea Boutique,” Boothe-Wood says, “but I’ve expanded to carry my own clothing label as well. My degree is in apparel design, so this is my opportunity after 20-plus years to use my education and passion.” Boothe-Wood carries additional clothing lines by local designers, and she hopes to expand soon and feature local artists as well. “The theme of 2•shea Boutique is fashion, beauty and art,” Boothe-Wood says. “Everything beautiful under one roof.”<br /> <br /> “If you love what you’re doing, it’s not really work. I feel that way — I love getting up in the morning, and I love what I do, and I love who I see. Every day’s a new challenge.” – Shea Boothe-Wood, oWner of 2•shea Boutique and trueBeautyrx<br /> <br /> “I would always look at old houses on the side of the highway and envision them remodeled.” – VICKI WHITE, REALTOR<br /> <br /> “I love helping people hear and putting a smile on their face.” – DR. DEBBIE SHIRICO, OWNER TOTAL HEARING CARE

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here