Florida Rancher Summer 2017 : Page 2

President’s Perspective Bill Frye, President, Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc. R ANCHER Volume 52, Number 2, Summer 2017 Publisher Bill Frye, President Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc. Associate Publisher Maria Knapp Staff Writer Josh Blackmon Graphic Design Jim Karantinos The Rancher is published quarterly in spring, summer, fall and winter by the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc., a non-profit corporation, Boys Ranch, Florida 32064. This is a free publication. If you have any questions, call 1-800-765-3797, or visit us on the web at www.youthranches.org. Copyright © 2017 by the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc. REQUIRED DISCLOSURE INFORMATION Florida Statutes Chapter 496, cited as the Solicitation of Contributions Act, was enacted by the 1991 Florida Legislature with an effective date of January 1, 1992. This law requires that organizations like the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc., furnish the following information with each fund solicitation and receipt for contributions received: “A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE OF FLORIDA, 1-800-HELP-FLA. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.” Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc. registration number is CH954. Sheriffs Ranches Enterprises, Inc. registration number is CH20347. THE FLORIDA SHERIFFS YOUTH RANCHES RECEIVES 100% OF THIS CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTION. New York -A copy of the latest annual report can be obtained from the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches or from the Office of the Attorney General by writing the Charities Bureau, 120 Broadway, New York, NY 10271. ® THE “I will venture to go…but remember that you must hold the ropes” -William Carey S everal months ago I had an interesting conversation with one of our ranchers. Rancher John decided while out on the tractor clearing undergrowth, as this is one of his job responsibilities, that he needed to share his thoughts with me. He told me that he had been thinking about some things for a while and decided to go right to the top and speak to the President. At the time John was 17 and has been living with us for over three years. John has plans to graduate high school this year and sign up for the Marine Corp. As you might imagine, he is also a role model for the young men just coming to the ranch and adjusting to our old fashioned culture. On the day John and I met, we talked for well over an hour and now here it is several months later and the conversation still resonates in my mind. We were talking about a young man who had been injured during heifer practice while getting ready to show his cow at the county fair. When I asked John about the accident, he explained to me that showing a heifer takes a lot of practice and patience. You have to continually show the heifer who is in control and how much you care for the animal. According to John, you do this by having a rope tied to the halter, worn by the cow and a big knot tied on the end of the rope itself. When I asked about the knot, John told me that the knot is there to make sure you never let go of the rope. You’re there to guide the heifer through the paces and to keep her calm in an arena where there are lots of other cows and crowds  2 THE RANCHER  SUMMER 2017

President’s Perspective

Bill Frye

“I will venture to go…but remember that you must hold the ropes”

-William Carey

Several months ago I had an interesting conversation with one of our ranchers. Rancher John decided while out on the tractor clearing undergrowth, as this is one of his job responsibilities, that he needed to share his thoughts with me. He told me that he had been thinking about some things for a while and decided to go right to the top and speak to the President. At the time John was 17 and has been living with us for over three years. John has plans to graduate high school this year and sign up for the Marine Corp. As you might imagine, he is also a role model for the young men just coming to the ranch and adjusting to our old fashioned culture.

On the day John and I met, we talked for well over an hour and now here it is several months later and the conversation still resonates in my mind. We were talking about a young man who had been injured during heifer practice while getting ready to show his cow at the county fair. When I asked John about the accident, he explained to me that showing a heifer takes a lot of practice and patience. You have to continually show the heifer who is in control and how much you care for the animal. According to John, you do this by having a rope tied to the halter, worn by the cow and a big knot tied on the end of the rope itself. When I asked about the knot, John told me that the knot is there to make sure you never let go of the rope. You’re there to guide the heifer through the paces and to keep her calm in an arena where there are lots of other cows and crowds of people. It is important to always have the rope in case the cow tries to break away and run. You are there to keep the heifer safe and to make sure no harm comes to her or others. Again, I asked about the accident, and he told me that his fellow rancher never let go of the rope but got too close and received a kick from a very stubborn cow. As we continued to talk, John said to me, “Mr. Frye, kids at the ranch need to know that you (meaning all the ranch staff) will never let go of the rope.”

That statement has been on my mind ever since he made it that day with such confidence. You see, “never letting go of the rope” is what we have been doing for almost 60 years now. In fact, it is what I would call the necessity of parenting and over the years we have helped both children and parents by either holding on to the rope personally or helping a struggling parent hold on. Just as my parents were there for me as I grew up, got married and raised my own family; we are there for our daughter and her family today. While the rope has grown longer over the years, the knot is still there at the end and we are still holding on in case the need arises where our help is needed.

Here at the Youth Ranches, our staff is the family for the children who come to us, whether it is in one of our residential programs like the Boys Ranch or our camping programs. Once they arrive, we take hold of the rope, we tie a knot at the end and we do not let go! For almost 60 years now we have held on to many ropes! That is why men and women from their 20’s through their 70’s still keep in touch and bring their families to visit “home”. We have attended graduations; various swearing in ceremonies, weddings and child births and sadly, funerals throughout these years. All because our kids and their families know we continue to hold on to the rope. As the years go by the symbolic rope still represents the fact that we are here just in case we are needed. Like the time when one of our former ranchers became disabled and we made sure his electricity stayed on while he recovered. Or one of our former youth, now a mother herself struggled with her own child and reached out to her former cottage parents for guidance. Or the relatives of a fallen rancher not being able to afford the cost of his funeral and reached out to us for help. The knot which is now the “bond” remains intact forever.

In this issue of the Rancher, you will read about some of our youth, hear their stories and see their pictures. Like every year before, many of our ranchers will be preparing to leave us to be reunited with their families or move into adulthood. Some will seek higher education and go off to college or trade schools, some will join the military and others will go straight into the workforce with skills learned while living in one of our residential communities. We that remain, with your help and support, will continue to hold the rope just in case they need a helping hand or a calm and reassuring voice as they continue their paths to success!

Thank you for your love, support, generosity and belief in what we do every day for God’s children. Most of all, thank you for holding on to our rope with its big knot at the end and allowing us to serve children and families in need!

God Bless,

Bill

Read the full article at http://trendmag2.trendoffset.com/article/President%E2%80%99s+Perspective/2794656/411496/article.html.

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